How You See Changes Who You Are


The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. (Matt 6:22-23, KJV)

That's a weird saying of Jesus. It's wedged between two statements about being generous and not being a slave to money or material fear.

There are two odd metaphors in here about the eye. First, the idea of the eye as a light or lamp. Second, the idea of a "single eye" in contrast to an "evil eye".

We think of the eye as a passive instrument. It receives light, sends it as images to the brain, and the brain makes sense of it. The world outside of the eye is objective, and the eye simply takes in what is there. If the world being observed by the eye is bright and lovely, it will send those images to the brain and that will likely make our disposition bright and lovely. If what the eye sees is ugly, the opposite is likely.

But Jesus implies something radically different here. It's not the external world that the eye passively observes. It's not the external world that shapes our inner selves. Instead, the eye is the light, rather than a receiver of light. Your eye - your consciousness, your attention, your perception, your way of seeing the world - is what determines the kind of person you'll be. The light of the eye in this verse is illuminating not just the external world, but the inner self.

This is fascinating. I have witnessed and experienced something like this many times. You probably have too. A pessimist and an optimist, for example, may observe the same event and come away believing different things and having different internal states because of it. One has an eye that perceives beauty and goodness, which causes them to shine internally. One has an eye that perceives the opposite. In the context of Jesus' sermon, he seems to be saying that a scarcity mindset that worries a great deal about money, material possessions, and material status relative to others (what today gets called "equality" in Social Justice circles) - an eye that sees lack instead an eye that sees abundance - will darken the soul.

The second metaphor is about the eye being "single". Maybe, as some have suggested, Jesus is talking about the "third eye" chakra or Pineal gland and telling everyone to get on some DMT and open the doors of perception. I wouldn't rule it out and it's certainly interesting and not really in conflict with the broader context.

But you don't have to get trippy to understand. The idea of singleness vs duality is repeated a lot in the Old and New Testament, usually with a bodily metaphor. Singleness of heart, singleness of mind (or its opposite, doublemindedness), and singleness of tongue. James talks about the doubleminded man being unstable in all he does, tossed around by every "wind of doctrine", or new fad or teaching, perhaps the trending hashtags of the day. David asks for an "undivided heart".

The idea of a single eye - paired with the idea of the eye not just receiving info about the world, but generating it as it illuminates what it sees - implies a lack of inner conflict. An untortured, unthreatened, consistent perception of the world. Jesus says right after this verse that you can't serve two masters, or you'll grow to despise one of them (PS - sometimes one of them is you). The idea of singleness is about peace of mind. In my experience, it is the greatest, most freeing thing to be of a single mind, or single eye (perception). It's having a vision that is clear and consistent.

It takes self knowledge, and especially brutal self-honesty, to clear away conflicting perceptions or desires. You may think you have a vision and start acting on it, while maintaining doubt or conflicting desire. This will tear you apart. Saying yes to things when you really want to say no will do the same (in this same sermon Jesus advises "let your yes be yes and your no be no"). Inner conflict comes from thinking you want one thing, or tricking yourself into believing it, while your gut really wants another. This gives you double vision. You can't see clearly. Your eye is not single.

I love this odd double metaphor of the eye as a lamp and a unitary tool of perception. It reminds that who we are is determined by how we see ourselves and the world.

On Being Radical


A reader emailed me asking how I feel comfortable sharing political views that are widely unpopular. He also asked if I've written about this, and I don't think I have, so here's my response:

I found that being somewhat radical has a high social price, but being REALLY radical doesn’t. For example, if I were to Tweet about how I don’t like a specific politician, or how I think a specific tax should be lower, I’d probably get a good bit of pushback. But my posts are about how I don’t care about any politician nor do I think any tax is a good idea at all. As such, it’s rather disarming to the political lynch mobs. It’s out of frame, so they don’t really know what to do with it.

I don’t consider myself political at all, and I don’t see things through that lens. I think this makes it easier to say some things, because I don’t speak in the language of trigger words people on the left and right are ready to fight with each other over.

My experience has been that if I am buying in to political narratives and picking a side, there’s a cost to talking about it. If I ignore news and politics and rise above the fray and focus on first principles like non-violence and individual liberty, the price is pretty low.

I also make a point to talk a lot more about positive things like my work, education, entrepreneurship, and other stuff than I do things deemed political.

Daily blogging really helped me get clarity on my thoughts and what I’m willing to share. Especially since nobody reads a personal blog at least for several years if ever.

Remember: you don’t NEED to weigh in and share your opinion. But your are free to. Just be unthreatened and willing to back them up with kindness and honesty.

The Morality of Capitalism PDF


This essay series I wrote some years ago was going to be published by an organization but ended up not happening. I figured I've got the PDF, so might as well post it here for posterity. Forgive the lack of cover design or any formalities.

The Morality of Capitalism

Attention Citizens!


Remember and rely on your programming.

Your job is to take all new information and integrate it into the Dominant Narrative immediately and without question or delay. The Narrative must by preserved and protected at all costs.

You must subjugate your sanity, critical thinking, curiosity, discomfort, prosperity, individuality, and ability to navigate the world and avoid pain to the Dominant Narrative. It subsumes all.

You will be informed when the Narrative changes and you must then reject your old Narrative justifications and replace them with new ones without question or delay.

Signed,

The Authoritative Council of High Narrative Magic

What if You Stopped Seeking the Truth?


https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/stop-seeking-truth

Searching for Vindication


It's easy for people with contrarian ideas and opinions to long for public validation. After years of being mocked and worn down, there's a tendency to fantasize about one great moment where all your opponents are owned and utterly embarrassed.

This is true in politics, business, and even sports. When you see something few others seem to see and you get ignored, or gaslit into thinking you are all alone and crazy for what you see, the desire for vindication and comeuppance grows. Sometimes it's innocent, but the vindication fantasy can become dangerous.

Being contrarian and right is powerful. It takes courage, but it can have big upside. But if you let all your energy go into fantasies about some external person or event out of your control revealing to the world that you're right, you become impotent. You slip into cultism, idolatry, delusion, frustration, delayed action, and uselessness.

Useful contrarianism requires that you accept that there is no big reveal that will happen where your enemies will be vanquished and doubters will bow and apologize.

The only person who can vindicate you is you. And the world almost certainly won't acknowledge it even when you're right. They'll pretend they always knew, or you got lucky.

Don't focus on being taken seriously or perceived as correct. Act on what you know, get the results you want in your own life, don't look to anyone else for salvation, and don't become desperate for acceptance. The great reveal is not coming. Only what you do today will manifest in your life tomorrow.

Anyone promising to vindicate you is probably playing you.

It’s Symbols All the Way Down


https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/symbolic-meaning-of-trump-protests-and-covid-policies?in=isaacmorehouse/sets/isaac-morehouse-podcast

Statelessness and the Burden of Proof


Normie: "It's not possible to live without govt"

Voluntarist: "Here are dozens of examples of stateless societies, many lasting hundreds of years"

Normie: "Life without government would be worse"

Voluntarist: "No stateless society has done nukes or genocide"

Normie: "It's not possible to live without govt"

----------

Normie: "You must prove that government is bad"

Voluntarist: "Why is the burden of proof on me to prove that an institution that has murdered more than 100 million people in the last century alone is bad?"

Normie: "Because Hobbes said we couldn't live without it"

Voluntarist: "But we have lived without it"

Normie: "Because its good"

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform, and the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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How You See Changes Who You Are


The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. (Matt 6:22-23, KJV)

That's a weird saying of Jesus. It's wedged between two statements about being generous and not being a slave to money or material fear.

There are two odd metaphors in here about the eye. First, the idea of the eye as a light or lamp. Second, the idea of a "single eye" in contrast to an "evil eye".

We think of the eye as a passive instrument. It receives light, sends it as images to the brain, and the brain makes sense of it. The world outside of the eye is objective, and the eye simply takes in what is there. If the world being observed by the eye is bright and lovely, it will send those images to the brain and that will likely make our disposition bright and lovely. If what the eye sees is ugly, the opposite is likely.

But Jesus implies something radically different here. It's not the external world that the eye passively observes. It's not the external world that shapes our inner selves. Instead, the eye is the light, rather than a receiver of light. Your eye - your consciousness, your attention, your perception, your way of seeing the world - is what determines the kind of person you'll be. The light of the eye in this verse is illuminating not just the external world, but the inner self.

This is fascinating. I have witnessed and experienced something like this many times. You probably have too. A pessimist and an optimist, for example, may observe the same event and come away believing different things and having different internal states because of it. One has an eye that perceives beauty and goodness, which causes them to shine internally. One has an eye that perceives the opposite. In the context of Jesus' sermon, he seems to be saying that a scarcity mindset that worries a great deal about money, material possessions, and material status relative to others (what today gets called "equality" in Social Justice circles) - an eye that sees lack instead an eye that sees abundance - will darken the soul.

The second metaphor is about the eye being "single". Maybe, as some have suggested, Jesus is talking about the "third eye" chakra or Pineal gland and telling everyone to get on some DMT and open the doors of perception. I wouldn't rule it out and it's certainly interesting and not really in conflict with the broader context.

But you don't have to get trippy to understand. The idea of singleness vs duality is repeated a lot in the Old and New Testament, usually with a bodily metaphor. Singleness of heart, singleness of mind (or its opposite, doublemindedness), and singleness of tongue. James talks about the doubleminded man being unstable in all he does, tossed around by every "wind of doctrine", or new fad or teaching, perhaps the trending hashtags of the day. David asks for an "undivided heart".

The idea of a single eye - paired with the idea of the eye not just receiving info about the world, but generating it as it illuminates what it sees - implies a lack of inner conflict. An untortured, unthreatened, consistent perception of the world. Jesus says right after this verse that you can't serve two masters, or you'll grow to despise one of them (PS - sometimes one of them is you). The idea of singleness is about peace of mind. In my experience, it is the greatest, most freeing thing to be of a single mind, or single eye (perception). It's having a vision that is clear and consistent.

It takes self knowledge, and especially brutal self-honesty, to clear away conflicting perceptions or desires. You may think you have a vision and start acting on it, while maintaining doubt or conflicting desire. This will tear you apart. Saying yes to things when you really want to say no will do the same (in this same sermon Jesus advises "let your yes be yes and your no be no"). Inner conflict comes from thinking you want one thing, or tricking yourself into believing it, while your gut really wants another. This gives you double vision. You can't see clearly. Your eye is not single.

I love this odd double metaphor of the eye as a lamp and a unitary tool of perception. It reminds that who we are is determined by how we see ourselves and the world.

On Being Radical


A reader emailed me asking how I feel comfortable sharing political views that are widely unpopular. He also asked if I've written about this, and I don't think I have, so here's my response:

I found that being somewhat radical has a high social price, but being REALLY radical doesn’t. For example, if I were to Tweet about how I don’t like a specific politician, or how I think a specific tax should be lower, I’d probably get a good bit of pushback. But my posts are about how I don’t care about any politician nor do I think any tax is a good idea at all. As such, it’s rather disarming to the political lynch mobs. It’s out of frame, so they don’t really know what to do with it.

I don’t consider myself political at all, and I don’t see things through that lens. I think this makes it easier to say some things, because I don’t speak in the language of trigger words people on the left and right are ready to fight with each other over.

My experience has been that if I am buying in to political narratives and picking a side, there’s a cost to talking about it. If I ignore news and politics and rise above the fray and focus on first principles like non-violence and individual liberty, the price is pretty low.

I also make a point to talk a lot more about positive things like my work, education, entrepreneurship, and other stuff than I do things deemed political.

Daily blogging really helped me get clarity on my thoughts and what I’m willing to share. Especially since nobody reads a personal blog at least for several years if ever.

Remember: you don’t NEED to weigh in and share your opinion. But your are free to. Just be unthreatened and willing to back them up with kindness and honesty.

The Morality of Capitalism PDF


This essay series I wrote some years ago was going to be published by an organization but ended up not happening. I figured I've got the PDF, so might as well post it here for posterity. Forgive the lack of cover design or any formalities.

The Morality of Capitalism

Attention Citizens!


Remember and rely on your programming.

Your job is to take all new information and integrate it into the Dominant Narrative immediately and without question or delay. The Narrative must by preserved and protected at all costs.

You must subjugate your sanity, critical thinking, curiosity, discomfort, prosperity, individuality, and ability to navigate the world and avoid pain to the Dominant Narrative. It subsumes all.

You will be informed when the Narrative changes and you must then reject your old Narrative justifications and replace them with new ones without question or delay.

Signed,

The Authoritative Council of High Narrative Magic

What if You Stopped Seeking the Truth?


https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/stop-seeking-truth

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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