A Fun Little Project About Brutally Honest Feedback


I woke up super early for some reason one day last week.

I decided to see what Squarespace was all about and spin up a website for a little project a few friends and I have joked about.

It's called Brutally Honest Coach.

The idea is that any kind of life or career guidance or advice is usually given in the context of a friendship, family, colleague, or customer relationship. This can be just the thing, since those people have some reasons to care about you and give you advice in line with your long term well-being.  This can also be just the thing to keep you blinded by your own bullshit, because nobody who knows you personally wants to be the one to give you uncomfortable feedback, and you may not want to ask uncomfortable questions.

It's the reason confessionals are done behind a veil. Anonymity or pseudonymity can be powerful forces, like wearing masks, that allow us to access truths and see things too hard to see or hear as our normal selves.

So anyway, I thought it would be fun to see if I could get the site up. Amazingly, it took me under and hour to set it up.

I even got a cadre of experienced advisors and coaches to agree to respond to queries from a shared inbox under the BHC moniker. So no, it's not me. (At least not just me.;-)

It's kind of a fun experiment. I may or may not keep it live, but I've wondered if there's a demand for this kind of thing. I actually envisioned a more open forum type experience, like an anonymous Quora, where everyone could see answers and questions but no real names were involved, but I didn't want to spend the time to mess with that. Plus quality control sounds like a lot of work.

The number of little ideas like this floating in my brain is too great to spend real time on any of them while I'm building a company, but I think it's been important for me to not shut down this kind of stuff entirely. It's the non-techie equivalent of doing open source stuff on the side.

The Time Element in Alchemy


"Everything he touches turns to gold."

The Midas idea, or Rumpelstiltskin, or alchemy in general brings to my mind an instant transformation from cheap material to gold. It's a useful analogy, but it lacks something.

On the way to the office this morning, a thought popped into my head. Everything I touch turns to gold. It was a weird thought, because it doesn't seem true. I've had tons of failures, and many more long, slow slogs through the shit-trenches to get success.

But it struck me that, if I collapse my life into a single set of before/after descriptions, the Midas idea may appear true. I have made some valuable stuff I'm proud of. If you look at the resources used before I mixed my labor with them, then look at the final outcome, it's like alchemy. If you add one missing element: time.

What if Midas had to touch something, and keep touching it, working it, adjusting it, sweating over it for years before it turned to gold? What if alchemy is as much about time and work as it is magic?

Even the great wizard Gandalf had to labor and sweat to transform the world with magic. Witches need rare, difficult to obtain ingredients and hard to learn spells and rituals to perform their feats.

If viewed outside of time, most human lives and activities resemble alchemy. We are masters at transforming lower order inputs into higher order goods. Adding time doesn't make it less magical.

Career Crashers with Chuck Grimmett


Be Generous with Your Work with Chuck Grimmett

Chuck Grimmett is the product manager at Crash. He joins Isaac to talk about how he launched his career through photography, internships, and a willingness to share his work.

Topics:

  • How Chuck used photography to land an internship with the Foundation for Economic Education and then transition to his first full-time role out of college
  • The power of being an engaged customer for creating career opportunities
  • How free work pays off in the future Creating opportunities with photography
  • Doing more than just applying for an opportunity

Links:

Visit Foundation for Economic Education

Chuck Grimmett’s Personal Website


Seizing Opportunity Before You’re Ready with Chuck Grimmett

In the last episode Chuck shared his story of launching his career with the Foundation for Economic Education, and in this episode, Chuck talks about how he transitioned from his first job into his career working in tech.

Topics:

  • Saying yes to projects before you are 100% ready
  • Just in time learning instead of just in case learning
  • Using side-projects to build trust and create opportunities
  • How consistently creating leads to opportunities

You can stay up-to-date on every Career Crasher episode as it launches here. Plus, if you’ve got a story or know someone who we should feature, don’t forget to email me!

How to Arbitrage Your Geography to Higher Income


https://medium.com/@isaacmorehouse/a-big-career-arbitrage-opportunity-1ddec46442e6?source=friends_link&sk=3b253c0c19581b47ea0facf42a0c82d3

Introducing Crash


We've learned a lot in the five years since creating the Praxis apprenticeship program.

We've seen the world change rapidly too. It's not so unusual anymore for people to understand that chasing degrees doesn't equal life and career success. There's a lot more buzz about self-directed living and learning.

As TK Coleman put it way back at the beginning, "We are pioneers of the inevitable".

Praxis provides one tangible way for mold-breakers to get started: an intensive bootcamp and apprenticeship. But we've encountered thousands (probably more like tens of thousands) of people who want to launch (or re-launch) their careers and who for whatever reason aren't a good fit for a startup apprenticeship. This thing is big. There are a lot of people blazing trails out there.

So the question is, if you choose to go your own way, do you have to go it alone?

We say no. We're building a platform for career-launchers of all stripes. It's called Crash.

We'll start with regular blog posts, a new podcast featuring stories of unconventional careers, a weekly newsletter, tools, resources, and a whole lot more coming soon.

Check out the first blog post to get a little more of the flavor, and be a part of the career revolution!

No, It’s Not the Degree


I often see people say things like, "Sure, they say you don't need a fancy degree to get the job, but then they hire people with fancy degrees."

It's not because companies are lying about not needing a degree. It's because candidates are totally lame and uninteresting.

In a pool of generic, flat, 2D resumes and applications, the better formal credential will get more attention, because there's nothing else to go on. In such a pool it's also true that anyone who can show anything more interesting than a paper credential will also get more attention. That is a really low bar.

Degrees are incredibly weak, flabby signals. Anyone with average or above intelligence, drive, or ambition is undersold by the signal of a degree, since they are already capable of proving more with just a tiny bit of creativity and work.

Don't blame the credential. Be more interesting.

Fox News: Bike Riding vs. Career Prep


What if we taught bike riding like we teach careers?

(Longer post on this idea here. Short clip below.)

 

How to Confront Big Changes in the World


There are two ways you can respond to unknowns and changes in technology, culture, politics, and society.

The first is to focus and worry about all the possible things these changes could do to the world at large, and fret over all the things you think and hope other people will do to make sure bad stuff doesn't happen.

The second is to ask yourself what you can do in your own life in light of these potential changes.

The first approach quickly becomes a runaway train of fear and negativity.  It's dangerous because it makes the second approach that much harder.  Fear and threat blind us to opportunity and optimism.  We're stuck in reactive mode, which leaves little room for creativity.  It puts our energy and attention in a fruitless spin, spent on things we can't control.

The second approach is amazing.  It takes a little time and patience, but when you tune out the stuff that's beyond your control and stop thinking of hypothetical scenarios involving theoretical people, you can zoom in on your own life, goals, desires, traits, and resources.  The world opens up and you see the opportunity in challenges and changes, rather than pure fear of the unknown.

Take a deep breath.

Whether the world is being disrupted and displaced at a frantic pace or not isn't the relevant question.  What about your life?  What's happening there?  What do you want to happen there?  How can you work with changes in the world to help rather than hinder those goals?

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program, and the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

Featured on -

Occasional Email Updates

Looking for something?


Blog Archives

Archives

A Fun Little Project About Brutally Honest Feedback


I woke up super early for some reason one day last week.

I decided to see what Squarespace was all about and spin up a website for a little project a few friends and I have joked about.

It's called Brutally Honest Coach.

The idea is that any kind of life or career guidance or advice is usually given in the context of a friendship, family, colleague, or customer relationship. This can be just the thing, since those people have some reasons to care about you and give you advice in line with your long term well-being.  This can also be just the thing to keep you blinded by your own bullshit, because nobody who knows you personally wants to be the one to give you uncomfortable feedback, and you may not want to ask uncomfortable questions.

It's the reason confessionals are done behind a veil. Anonymity or pseudonymity can be powerful forces, like wearing masks, that allow us to access truths and see things too hard to see or hear as our normal selves.

So anyway, I thought it would be fun to see if I could get the site up. Amazingly, it took me under and hour to set it up.

I even got a cadre of experienced advisors and coaches to agree to respond to queries from a shared inbox under the BHC moniker. So no, it's not me. (At least not just me.;-)

It's kind of a fun experiment. I may or may not keep it live, but I've wondered if there's a demand for this kind of thing. I actually envisioned a more open forum type experience, like an anonymous Quora, where everyone could see answers and questions but no real names were involved, but I didn't want to spend the time to mess with that. Plus quality control sounds like a lot of work.

The number of little ideas like this floating in my brain is too great to spend real time on any of them while I'm building a company, but I think it's been important for me to not shut down this kind of stuff entirely. It's the non-techie equivalent of doing open source stuff on the side.

The Time Element in Alchemy


"Everything he touches turns to gold."

The Midas idea, or Rumpelstiltskin, or alchemy in general brings to my mind an instant transformation from cheap material to gold. It's a useful analogy, but it lacks something.

On the way to the office this morning, a thought popped into my head. Everything I touch turns to gold. It was a weird thought, because it doesn't seem true. I've had tons of failures, and many more long, slow slogs through the shit-trenches to get success.

But it struck me that, if I collapse my life into a single set of before/after descriptions, the Midas idea may appear true. I have made some valuable stuff I'm proud of. If you look at the resources used before I mixed my labor with them, then look at the final outcome, it's like alchemy. If you add one missing element: time.

What if Midas had to touch something, and keep touching it, working it, adjusting it, sweating over it for years before it turned to gold? What if alchemy is as much about time and work as it is magic?

Even the great wizard Gandalf had to labor and sweat to transform the world with magic. Witches need rare, difficult to obtain ingredients and hard to learn spells and rituals to perform their feats.

If viewed outside of time, most human lives and activities resemble alchemy. We are masters at transforming lower order inputs into higher order goods. Adding time doesn't make it less magical.

Career Crashers with Chuck Grimmett


Be Generous with Your Work with Chuck Grimmett

Chuck Grimmett is the product manager at Crash. He joins Isaac to talk about how he launched his career through photography, internships, and a willingness to share his work.

Topics:

  • How Chuck used photography to land an internship with the Foundation for Economic Education and then transition to his first full-time role out of college
  • The power of being an engaged customer for creating career opportunities
  • How free work pays off in the future Creating opportunities with photography
  • Doing more than just applying for an opportunity

Links:

Visit Foundation for Economic Education

Chuck Grimmett’s Personal Website


Seizing Opportunity Before You’re Ready with Chuck Grimmett

In the last episode Chuck shared his story of launching his career with the Foundation for Economic Education, and in this episode, Chuck talks about how he transitioned from his first job into his career working in tech.

Topics:

  • Saying yes to projects before you are 100% ready
  • Just in time learning instead of just in case learning
  • Using side-projects to build trust and create opportunities
  • How consistently creating leads to opportunities

You can stay up-to-date on every Career Crasher episode as it launches here. Plus, if you’ve got a story or know someone who we should feature, don’t forget to email me!

How to Arbitrage Your Geography to Higher Income


https://medium.com/@isaacmorehouse/a-big-career-arbitrage-opportunity-1ddec46442e6?source=friends_link&sk=3b253c0c19581b47ea0facf42a0c82d3

Introducing Crash


We've learned a lot in the five years since creating the Praxis apprenticeship program.

We've seen the world change rapidly too. It's not so unusual anymore for people to understand that chasing degrees doesn't equal life and career success. There's a lot more buzz about self-directed living and learning.

As TK Coleman put it way back at the beginning, "We are pioneers of the inevitable".

Praxis provides one tangible way for mold-breakers to get started: an intensive bootcamp and apprenticeship. But we've encountered thousands (probably more like tens of thousands) of people who want to launch (or re-launch) their careers and who for whatever reason aren't a good fit for a startup apprenticeship. This thing is big. There are a lot of people blazing trails out there.

So the question is, if you choose to go your own way, do you have to go it alone?

We say no. We're building a platform for career-launchers of all stripes. It's called Crash.

We'll start with regular blog posts, a new podcast featuring stories of unconventional careers, a weekly newsletter, tools, resources, and a whole lot more coming soon.

Check out the first blog post to get a little more of the flavor, and be a part of the career revolution!

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

Featured on -

Occasional Email Updates

Looking for something?


Blog Archives

Archives