School is Weird


My nine-year old daughter started attending some once a week homeschool classes. After the first week, I asked how she liked it. She said, "It's OK. It's fun to see people and I like lunch and recess. But the rest is weird."

I asked what was weird about it.

"We sit in the same place for 45 minutes in each class and just listen to the teacher talk. The entire time! We're supposed to learn just from listening to what she says and memorizing it?! It's so weird. That's literally ALL it is!"

She wasn't complaining. She was genuinely mystified. I don't know what she expected, but this classroom experience was so foreign to her, she seemed to be wondering why no one else finds this odd and who in their right mind would think people would learn in this fashion.

She's a curious kid and very hands-on. It was a good reminder how the main thrust of schooling is to condition kids out of natural learning and make blind obedience, even with no clear goal or measure of effectiveness, normalized.

Setting the Trajectory of the Day


A day is like a rocket without steering. The trajectory on which it begins determines the arc. Small changes in that trajectory matter a lot.

Beginning the day on my terms is important. The challenge is that those terms change and it's not always easy to tell what they are. What will allow me to feel free and in control of the day, vs. feeling dragged along by it?

Today, it was starting with a walk outside and a blog post. I knew I needed to avoid any screens until I had some protein, got some movement in the morning sun, and sat down with a fresh cup of coffee. When I sat down, I realized I needed a playlist and a few minutes to write before I opened emails or Slack or surveyed and prepared my week or work.

This allows me to create and think independent of any demands as the first activity of the day. It puts me in a frame of ownership. I feel balanced. So when the demands start coming, it feels easier to field them because I feel autonomous.

Some days I get up, hop right on my computer and immediately start checking emails and Slack and reacting to what I missed overnight. It feels chaotic and those days don't end well.

So consider this post the setting of my trajectory for today. Take charge of yours and enjoy it. I'll do the same.

Segment on Fox News


If you caught me on the news talking about Crash.co and discoverpraxis.com, welcome!

Crash was experiencing some outages due to crazy traffic, but please come back and check it out again. So sorry about that. Meantime, feel free to browse around here and check out some of my books and podcasts on education and career.

Some resources:

If you didn't see it, you can watch the clip here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PN22EBdqo0

 

 

An Internet Frog Talks Bitcoin


Watch on Streamanity:

https://streamanity.com/video/gWm9BeacgTaba4

On SoundCloud or any podcast app (under the Isaac Morehouse Podcast).

If you must, it's also on YouTube.

Inner Game of Startups #46


Read it here.

But How Do I Unsubscribe?


https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/but-how-do-i-unsubscribe?in=isaacmorehouse/sets/isaac-morehouse-podcast

Billionaires in a Free Market


Someone else having a billion dollars does no harm to you.

It very likely makes their life harder - not materially, but emotionally, spiritually, and psychologically - but it does nothing to make you worse off. If you feel less happy because you envy them, that is not caused by their billion dollars, but by your choice to judge yourself in dollars and against another person. That's an unhappiness only you can fix by changing your orientation.

It is possible that someone obtained a billion dollars through violence. The most likely scenario is via collaboration with government, as it would be very difficult and very rare to do so violently without at least some state cooperation. Gaining wealth via government, which is always backed by the initiation of violence, causes harm to the world. Taxpayers and those prohibited from peaceful activity by monopoly protections are harmed.

But notice it's the acts of theft and violence that do the harm, not the billion dollars itself. The having of the billion does not by itself cause harm, only if the process of obtaining it did. Then the problem is with that process, not the money.

One could use a billion dollars to do harmful things, like buy weapons to hurt people. But then the hurting of the people is doing the harm, not the holding or spending of the billion dollars.

There is no way in which another person having possession of a billion dollars can harm you. Outside the peaceful free market they may cause harm in obtaining it or use it to cause harm.

But if they obtained it via market means (no violence, just voluntary exchange) and use it on the market (again peacefully), not only does someone else getting, holding, or spending a billion dollars do the world no harm, it does tremendous good and creates value.

The only way to obtain money (absent force) is to take a resource valued at X, do something to it, and exchange it with someone who values it at >X. The > is the profit you earn, and also a measure of the minimum amount of value that was created. Value that did not exist prior to the exchange.

Even those who earn billions by investing in companies and then "doing nothing" while the company gains value are creating value. Not only by providing capital that the company needs to earn profit (create value), but the process of investing itself is so full of efforts and failures that it generates untold new information that makes the market better and better and innovating and creating new value. The billions earned on a few winning investments pale in comparison to the untold benefit created by all the failed investments that pushed ideas and products forward and created priceless info about what works and doesn't.

So billionaires in a free market are no threat, and their wealth is likely a sign of tons of value created for you and others. This doesn't make them morally good people or intellectual adept or fun or kind or anything else. It just means their existence is no threat and how they got there created benefit for others, intentionally or not.

Billionaires in an unfree market don't harm you by mere fact of having a billion dollars, but they way they got it or what they use it for could.

Fight for freedom, not against others having arbitrary amounts of money.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform, and the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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School is Weird


My nine-year old daughter started attending some once a week homeschool classes. After the first week, I asked how she liked it. She said, "It's OK. It's fun to see people and I like lunch and recess. But the rest is weird."

I asked what was weird about it.

"We sit in the same place for 45 minutes in each class and just listen to the teacher talk. The entire time! We're supposed to learn just from listening to what she says and memorizing it?! It's so weird. That's literally ALL it is!"

She wasn't complaining. She was genuinely mystified. I don't know what she expected, but this classroom experience was so foreign to her, she seemed to be wondering why no one else finds this odd and who in their right mind would think people would learn in this fashion.

She's a curious kid and very hands-on. It was a good reminder how the main thrust of schooling is to condition kids out of natural learning and make blind obedience, even with no clear goal or measure of effectiveness, normalized.

Setting the Trajectory of the Day


A day is like a rocket without steering. The trajectory on which it begins determines the arc. Small changes in that trajectory matter a lot.

Beginning the day on my terms is important. The challenge is that those terms change and it's not always easy to tell what they are. What will allow me to feel free and in control of the day, vs. feeling dragged along by it?

Today, it was starting with a walk outside and a blog post. I knew I needed to avoid any screens until I had some protein, got some movement in the morning sun, and sat down with a fresh cup of coffee. When I sat down, I realized I needed a playlist and a few minutes to write before I opened emails or Slack or surveyed and prepared my week or work.

This allows me to create and think independent of any demands as the first activity of the day. It puts me in a frame of ownership. I feel balanced. So when the demands start coming, it feels easier to field them because I feel autonomous.

Some days I get up, hop right on my computer and immediately start checking emails and Slack and reacting to what I missed overnight. It feels chaotic and those days don't end well.

So consider this post the setting of my trajectory for today. Take charge of yours and enjoy it. I'll do the same.

Segment on Fox News


If you caught me on the news talking about Crash.co and discoverpraxis.com, welcome!

Crash was experiencing some outages due to crazy traffic, but please come back and check it out again. So sorry about that. Meantime, feel free to browse around here and check out some of my books and podcasts on education and career.

Some resources:

If you didn't see it, you can watch the clip here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PN22EBdqo0

 

 

An Internet Frog Talks Bitcoin


Watch on Streamanity:

https://streamanity.com/video/gWm9BeacgTaba4

On SoundCloud or any podcast app (under the Isaac Morehouse Podcast).

If you must, it's also on YouTube.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

Featured on -

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