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Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform, and the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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Ask Isaac: Goals – Hate ’em? Love ’em? Use ’em? Shove ’em?


I'm not big on goal setting, yet I think consistent structure is key to achieving what you want (even if what you want isn't perfectly defined).

I discuss this and a few other items on this episode.

Check out the episode sponsor, The Foundation for Economic Education to apply for an amazing experience learning about economics!

This and all episodes are also available on SoundCloud, iTunes, YouTube, and Stitcher.

A New Approach Next Month


After daily blogging for over a year, I'm going to try mixing things up for February and March.  In part because I'll be in Ecuador most of the time, in part because I want to make myself write longer stuff more often, in part because I'm curious and I like change. 

I'll still be writing or creating something every day, but I'll be posting to the blog less frequently. My current plan is:

  • Weekly podcasts on Mondays
  • Special/Ask Isaac episode a second day per week
  • Longish article once a week

I might add some shorter posts in between as well. We'll see how it goes. Honestly I'm more scared of not blogging every day at this point than I was of doing it in the first place. I fear I'll become an illiterate slob or forget how to live a normal day without blogging or stop trimming my fingernails or something.

Time will tell!

My Ceaseless Quest to Make Myself Useless


I'm on a ceaseless quest.  This quest it based on a belief about myself and the world:

For everything that I do there is someone somewhere who can do it better.

When I start doing something new my quest is always to find the person who can do it better and hand over the reins as soon as possible.

Where and when I've succeeded at that, I've succeeded.

I fully believe the maxim that you'll be most successful when you find and do the things that no one else can do as well - the things that are uniquely you.  But if I always believe there is someone who can do everything I do better, and I'm always trying to find them and hand it off, what does that make me uniquely good at?

I don't really know.  Here are two possible answers.  One is that at any given time I might be the best person for something.  So that's what I'll be doing.  But that time is limited.  In the long run, even though I might be uniquely perfect for something at first, someone else might be better.

The other possible answer is that my most unique and valuable skill is replacing myself.

Maybe I'm best at breaking new ground, getting the basics figured out, identifying nascent talent in someone else, and transitioning things to them so they can blossom in a way no one else - including me - ever could.

Whatever the answer I am totally confident that, given enough time, I can find someone who can do everything I do better.  This doesn't threaten or bother me.  It fills me with excitement!  Where are they?  How can I find them?  How soon can I get them catapulted to heights I could never reach?  When can I replace myself with someone better?

If you share a similar disposition know you're not alone.  If you know you're a jack of many trades but master of none don't fear.  That's its own kind of mastery.  At least I hope so.  It's worked pretty well for me so far and I'm having fun.

How to Get Ahead


Want to get ahead in your life and career?  Here's a really simple way to think about and approach it:

Find something someone is currently doing that you can do better.  Convince them to hire you to do it for them.

That's it.  That's pretty much how every job and customer has ever been won.

So how do you do it?  First you need to observe.  Look around and see what people are doing.  Look within and discover what you do well.  Look for places where the quality gap between what you can do and how most people are doing it is large.

Then you need to convince.  This part seems pretty hard.  It's actually fairly straightforward, though it takes a lot of grit and determination.  There are really only two ways to convince someone to give you a chance to do something for them:

  1. Demonstrate beyond a doubt that you can create value for them.
  2. Be so cheap they're willing to take a chance on minimal evidence.

Many people get stuck on number one.  They think it's a catch 22.  How can you prove your ability to create value if you need proven ability to get the chance?  That's where number two comes in.  Make yourself so cheap - minimal to no money, minimal instruction and maintenance - that it's hard to say no.

Once you get the chance to create value for someone for free, you've got a calling card.  You've got proven value creation.  Now you can go to the next opportunity and prove that you can do whatever they're doing (or paying someone else to do) better.

Every one of the best people I've worked with began working for free.  I had a hunch they could create value for me, but it was a risk.  They mitigated the risk by offering to work free until they demonstrated how valuable they were.

This advice, if you take it to heart and really apply it, will get you further than any degree or credential you can buy.

Episode 46: Counseling the Counselors, with Joe Sanok of Practice of the Practice


Joe Sanok is one of the most enterprising people I know.  We are old friends who started a band and a nonprofit together a decade and a half ago.  We both went our way and haven't regularly kept up.  But Joe hasn't stopped finding creative ways to build things and provide and capture value.

He started a counseling practice of his own on the side, grew it into a full-time gig, then started hiring people to help, and now he's launched a podcast, website, conference and series of products aimed at helping other counselors do the same.

This episode is not just about counseling practices.  It's a great exploration of mindsets for success.  We talked about his beginnings in Kirby sales, starting his own counseling service, keeping his finances in control and how to look beyond the zero-sum-game view.

Joe also states what he sees as the biggest obstacle people face when they want to launch something of their own into the world and shares his E-Course with listeners:

Moving From Being Paralyzed by Perfection to Getting Things Done

This episode sponsored by FEE, where 14-16 year-olds can check out amazing conferences and apply here. Tell them you heard about it here.

We're also sponsored by Praxis, where you can get off the conveyor belt and build an entrepreneurial career today, no debt, no waiting, and no credentials required.  Apply today.

This and all episodes are available on SoundCloud, iTunes, YouTube, and Stitcher.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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