Nothing found.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform, and the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

Featured on -

Looking for something?


Blog Archives

Archives

A Conversation About Ecuador


I joined the wonderful World Wanderers Podcast (hosted by Amanda Kingsmith and Praxis participant Ryan Ferguson!) to talk about our family trip to Ecuador.

I haven't listened to the episode yet, but we recorded it less than a week after we got back from the trip and I remember wondering if I'd even been able to process the experience enough to talk about it sensibly.  I did talk about it (a lot...I think I probably rambled at length...sorry!) and give a sort of quick take on the good, bad, and ugly and some lessons learned.  Still, I'm sure as time goes on we'll form more ideas about our experience.

It was really awesome and also really hard.  It didn't go to plan, but I wouldn't trade it.  A great adventure I don't think any of us will forget!

Anyway, take a listen to the episode if you're interested in hearing one person's take on international travel with kids.  Oh, and listen to other episodes of WWP.  It's a great show!

Here's the episode.

Public Speaking Workshop is Live


*This workshop is not primarily about tips and techniques (though they are offered).  It's about you giving a speech and getting individualized feedback and ways to improve.

We've been doing a public speaking workshop for Praxis participants for a few years, and now for the first time I'm opening it up to the public.  It's a process I learned from an amazing public speaking coach years ago when I was running a summer fellowship program at IHS.

I'll only be accepting 10 people in this course since it demands individual time and attention for each participant to watch your speeches and provide feedback.

Check out the course here.

The course is $149, as cheap as I could get it considering the time required.

The layout is pretty straightforward.  There are a series of ten short videos with tips and best practices for your preparation, props, eyes, mouth, hands, feet, and a few final odds and ends.

After watching the videos you'll record yourself giving a 3-minute speech in front of at least one other person, submit it between May 1-3, I'll respond with feedback within 24 hours, and you'll do a second take and submit between May 4-6, and again I'll deliver final feedback within 24 hours.

The course videos can be watched anytime, as many times as you like, but submissions will only be taken and feedback provided between May 1-7.

This is a pretty awesome workshop I've been through myself, and I think you'll find it valuable.  This open online version is new, and I'm excited to see how it goes!

You can sign up here.

The Secret Weapon Young People Have on the Job Market…


Nothing better to do.

The only things that matter when it comes to succeeding in the marketplace are:

  1. The ability to create value for others.
  2. The ability to persuade others of your value creation potential.

It's not your school, your grades, your network, your knowledge or anything else you may have been told.  Those things are only useful insofar as they help you do #1 or #2.

This should be an empowering revelation.  Value creation opportunities abound.  Yet it often makes young people feel intimidated.  After years in classrooms acquiring few real-world skills and gaining knowledge that is basically an inferior version of what experts possess, how are they supposed to create value for anyone?

Here's where the secret weapon comes in.

Value creation is not about having an absolute advantage over others at some activity.  It's about having a comparative advantage.  This concept, popularized by David Ricardo a few hundred years ago, is a powerful tool to understand and seize opportunity as a young person.  It reveals the secret weapon called 'nothing better to do.'

To have a comparative advantage at something simply requires that your opportunity cost is lower than others.  What you have to give up to engage in that activity is less valuable than what they have to give up.

Young people with few skills and little experience don't have a lot of high value options for how to use their time, so their opportunity cost tends to be very low.  This makes their value creation potential high.

How does it work?

Imagine a CEO who is incredibly organized, detail-oriented, and something of a wizard at scheduling, logistics, travel planning, and utilizing all the best productivity apps and tools.  She's many times better at this than an aspiring 18-year-old.  Yet for every hour she spends planning her travel and meetings, she gives up the ability to spend that hour selling a new client or planning the marketing expansion.  Those are high-value activities, say with the potential to bring in another $30,000 in revenue.  How much is excellent travel planning worth?  Something, but less than that.  Her opportunity cost is very high.

That 18-year-old, on the other hand, has nothing better to do.  Even if it took him three hours to do the travel planning she could do in one, he would be giving up a lot less.  He could no longer browse Facebook, read a textbook, watch Netflix, or play basketball.  There is nothing bad about those activities, but none of them likely have the potential to create $30,000 worth of value for him.

If our 18-year-old realizes this, he has a powerful weapon.  He can offer to take over scheduling for the CEO and free her up to do more valuable work.  She might be reticent because it's possible that he could actually create more work if he's really bad.  To reduce risk further, he can go all in and offer to do it for free and demonstrate his ability by planning one mock trip to show her.

This requires no special skills, just a touch of creativity, persistence, and Googling.  Yet if he lands the gig, even unpaid, he will be exposed to the world of a CEO and probably learn more in a month than he could in a year sitting in classrooms.  He can observe the company and identify other areas to create value - other areas where his opportunity cost is lower than others - and potentiall parlay this into a really cool role there or at another company.  Maybe he can even learn how to start his own.

So few young people try anything like this.  They're stuck spending endless hours and countless dollars getting a piece of paper that makes them identical to every other young person.  They accumulate debt and expectations that make them feel the need to enter the professional world at a level of pay that, frankly, they can't yet justify with their limited skill and experience.  They feel it would be beneath them, after getting an expensive degree, to work for free or low pay to get a foot in the door.  They are completely nuetralizing their greatest asset, their low opportunity cost.

If you're young and have little in the way of monthly expenses or valuable opportunities in front of you, rejoice.  This means you can explore and test and try a great many things.  Your ability to create value is tremendous if you look for places where others have a high opportunity cost and you do not.

Get off the conveyor belt.  Break the mold.  Go do some cool stuff.

If you want a paid apprenticeship with an amazing entrepreneur + rigorous personal and professional development and coaching, check out discoverpraxis.com.

Ask Isaac: ‘Business Bores Me’, Ecuador, Blogging Tips, and Startup Stuff


Some questions have accumulated and it’s time for an Ask Isaac episode!  I really enjoy doing these because there's no logistical stress with a guest, no prep work, and I get to talk directly to listeners, which feels kind of intimate (as weird as that sounds since I'm just talking into a mic in a room by myself).  Plus, the questions are always fun and I like wrestling with them verbally.

*If you love the show (or even can mildly tolerate it), please review it on iTunes!*

As you may know, I recently spent a couple of weeks in Ecuador with my family and there were a couple of questions regarding that adventure.  I was interviewed in depth about the trip on the (excellent) World Wanderers Podcast.  The episode should be live soon.

Other questions that were answered here:

  • Why ‘Ask Isaac’ episodes aren’t numbered?
  • A father asks about whether his daughter who is an average, B student who is not sure about her path and who was turned off from business by her econ class, would be a good candidate for Praxis?  (I cheated and had TK Coleman provide an answer which I echoed and emphasized the need to focus on creating value.)
  • Keri would like to start blogging every day and she wonders how do I do it.  Do you pick a niche to stick to?  Where does inspiration come from?
  • Another question on blogging comes from Peter who asks how I handle editing of my posts.   Do I edit immediately or do I post as soon as I write it down?  (Yes)
  • Philip wonders whether some people are unfit for a startup and what is the one characteristic needed in order to thrive in a startup?

(NOTE: For some reason, the sound is a little tinny on this episode.  It seems like my mic settings were a bit off.  Sorry!  Just pretend it's more "authentic" that way, like a scratchy vinyl record.)

Send me questions anytime about anything.  I love to get them and will respond!

Sponsor Spot: If you want to spend a year apprenticing with an entrepreneur and building your own brand, skills, experience, confidence, network, and knowledge, apply to Praxis today.  The program cost nets out to $0.  What you earn equals what you pay.  Zero debt, zero BS, zero wasting away killing time.  One year will change your life.

This and all episodes are also available on SoundCloud, iTunes, YouTube, and Stitcher.

Easter and Tax Season


There's an old saying about death and taxes.

With both I'd like to grind some axes.

Both are surmountable, unnecessary.

Of the two, which first will we bury?

At least one man overcame death, once upon an Easter,

But even he felt compelled to 'Render unto Caesar'.

I guess it's progress, though.

One down, and one to go.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

Featured on -

Occasional Email Updates

[mc4wp_form id="3197"]

Looking for something?


Blog Archives

Archives