Convo with VCs Investing in Bitcoin


(Also available on the Isaac Morehouse podcast)

https://youtu.be/yg8ogGYKtfI

All News is Fake News


There is infinite information in the universe. Any time you select a tiny slice of info and focus on it, you are creating a story that is different from reality itself.

Imagine a movie sliced into a million still screenshots. Say it was impossible to watch the movie and your only way of interacting with it was with these screenshots. If someone picked three of them and presented it to you as the "truth" of the movie, they'd be wrong, even if the screenshots weren't tampered with or substituted for fakes. If the person presenting the "facts" of the movie to you had an ax to grind or wasn't so scrupulous about accuracy in screenshots, it would be even worse. But the main point is that even if trying to be accurate, any version of the movie selected from a few micro-second still frames will present a story that's incorrect.

Once you realize this, you can select your own slices based on what helps you achieve your goals. It may be no more accurate in terms of explaining the real movie, but none can be, so you might as well choose slices that help you. Better yet, you can stop worrying about figuring out the right version of this movie from the past and start creating your own story going into the future.

News is a specific view of reality. It's always wrong. Worse, it's usually bad for your health and sanity. Choose better slices of reality and your reality will improve.

Small Moves to Setup Big Moves


When opportunity avails itself you're either ready to big seize it, little seize it, or miss out entirely.

It's easy to see someone who makes a big move to nab a big opportunity and think it was luck or good timing alone. But it's not the moment that matters most, but the buildup.

If you constantly make little moves that get you better and better positioned in case of opportunity, you'll be able to make big moves when it comes. This seems obvious, but it's very hard to do.

During no-opportunity times you look around and see no great big moves to make. True. Frustrating. But if you keep looking and thinking about future scenarios, you can spot steady small moves that will compound, each shifting just a bit more of your resources into position to take advantage if big opportunity should emerge. Each small move gets max leverage when opportunity comes, and the little opportunity costs of those little moves comes back and a whole lot more.

Don't worry about how you missed out on big opportunity, or how you don't see it around you. Make small moves to be in position and get your mind ready. It will come.

Assumption of Audience


A lot of misunderstanding and offense online comes from assuming the audience.

When we read posts, we tend to assume we are the audience. When the content doesn't fit us, we assume it's wrong.

Whenever I witness this, I think of the scene in Star Wars, "This is not the post you are looking for". If it doesn't click for you, move on. It's probably not for you. Whether positive advice that seems dumb to you, or a negative attack that seems incorrect to you, odds are it's between two parties you don't understand and they aren't writing with you and your situation in mind.

Trying to educate the poster on your situation and let them know they their content doesn't fit it is almost never a good idea. Because they assume you're part of their audience too. And if you say, "Hey, I'm not your audience but I don't agree with this", it signals a waste of both of your time.

Before you respond, ask yourself who the intended audience is. It helps.

Antagonism and Action


One of the most useful methods I've found to get closer to actionable truth is by creating (non-hostile) antagonism.

If I'm unsure about options, I will pick one and act as if it's true. I'll argue in favor of it as if it's the only way. I'll make the best, strongest arguments for it I can, and won't hedge. This requires someone else to take up the opposite position, if nothing else just to get it a fair hearing. But I'm gonna come on strong, so they are going to have to bring the strongest arguments to match.

With two people fully going to bat for the two positions, the truth is more likely to reveal itself far faster than if we just dance around the weaker "on the one hand but on the other hand" stuff.

Not only does going all in on one position draw out useful arguments from others for the alternate position, but it lets me test drive being a devotee of my position and see if it resonates with my gut. The most important truths are those you just know with your knower, even if you can't consciously articulate or understand why. Indecision is when that gut feeling isn't strong enough either way to cut through the intellectual pros and cons. Examining positions objectively at a distance is an intellectual exercise that doesn't always help discover the gut feeling.

But putting on a position like it's true and going all in gives a taste of what it feels like to live in that reality. The gut gets a chance to scream "this feels off" or "Yes, this is right!"

The hard part about this approach is that it can feel shocking or disheartening or overwhelming to people if they aren't used to it. I grew up in a loud, talkative, interrupting, arguing household. To me, disagreeing is not offensive. There's nothing personal about attacking each others arguments within a trusted context. But I've learned over the years this is not normal and I often end up bowling over people and they just yield to my pigheaded arguments...even if I'm just test driving them myself.

I've tried to ease back some, but mostly to collaborate with people who can get down with strong argument as a form of truth discovery.

PS - I find this works really well for action items. I do not like this approach for discovering philosophical, moral, or abstract truth.

Father’s Day Haiku


It's a lot of work

To let kids do things for me

Here goes Father's Day!

TK Coleman – Virtue Signalling and Corporate Activism Aren’t the Enemy


Had another great chat with TK about alot going on in the world today.

We chat about his beef with free-market advocates who fail to see when the market is winning and instead fear what it might produce.

We dive into companies responding to social outrage, whether it's a worrisome sign of mob mentality or a positive process for truth discovery, and a whole lot more.

Audio version here (and on all podcast platforms under The Isaac Morehouse Podcast)

https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/tk-coleman-virtue-signalling-and-corporate-activism-arent-the-enemy

 

Video version here:

https://youtu.be/LZTSGQeGlr4

 

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the CEO of Crash, the career launch platform, and the founder of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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Segment on Fox News


If you caught me on the news talking about Crash.co and discoverpraxis.com, welcome!

Crash was experiencing some outages due to crazy traffic, but please come back and check it out again. So sorry about that. Meantime, feel free to browse around here and check out some of my books and podcasts on education and career.

Some resources:

If you didn't see it, you can watch the clip here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PN22EBdqo0

 

 

An Internet Frog Talks Bitcoin


Watch on Streamanity:

https://streamanity.com/video/gWm9BeacgTaba4

On SoundCloud or any podcast app (under the Isaac Morehouse Podcast).

If you must, it's also on YouTube.

Inner Game of Startups #46


Read it here.

But How Do I Unsubscribe?


https://soundcloud.com/isaacmorehouse/but-how-do-i-unsubscribe?in=isaacmorehouse/sets/isaac-morehouse-podcast

Billionaires in a Free Market


Someone else having a billion dollars does no harm to you.

It very likely makes their life harder - not materially, but emotionally, spiritually, and psychologically - but it does nothing to make you worse off. If you feel less happy because you envy them, that is not caused by their billion dollars, but by your choice to judge yourself in dollars and against another person. That's an unhappiness only you can fix by changing your orientation.

It is possible that someone obtained a billion dollars through violence. The most likely scenario is via collaboration with government, as it would be very difficult and very rare to do so violently without at least some state cooperation. Gaining wealth via government, which is always backed by the initiation of violence, causes harm to the world. Taxpayers and those prohibited from peaceful activity by monopoly protections are harmed.

But notice it's the acts of theft and violence that do the harm, not the billion dollars itself. The having of the billion does not by itself cause harm, only if the process of obtaining it did. Then the problem is with that process, not the money.

One could use a billion dollars to do harmful things, like buy weapons to hurt people. But then the hurting of the people is doing the harm, not the holding or spending of the billion dollars.

There is no way in which another person having possession of a billion dollars can harm you. Outside the peaceful free market they may cause harm in obtaining it or use it to cause harm.

But if they obtained it via market means (no violence, just voluntary exchange) and use it on the market (again peacefully), not only does someone else getting, holding, or spending a billion dollars do the world no harm, it does tremendous good and creates value.

The only way to obtain money (absent force) is to take a resource valued at X, do something to it, and exchange it with someone who values it at >X. The > is the profit you earn, and also a measure of the minimum amount of value that was created. Value that did not exist prior to the exchange.

Even those who earn billions by investing in companies and then "doing nothing" while the company gains value are creating value. Not only by providing capital that the company needs to earn profit (create value), but the process of investing itself is so full of efforts and failures that it generates untold new information that makes the market better and better and innovating and creating new value. The billions earned on a few winning investments pale in comparison to the untold benefit created by all the failed investments that pushed ideas and products forward and created priceless info about what works and doesn't.

So billionaires in a free market are no threat, and their wealth is likely a sign of tons of value created for you and others. This doesn't make them morally good people or intellectual adept or fun or kind or anything else. It just means their existence is no threat and how they got there created benefit for others, intentionally or not.

Billionaires in an unfree market don't harm you by mere fact of having a billion dollars, but they way they got it or what they use it for could.

Fight for freedom, not against others having arbitrary amounts of money.

Isaac Morehouse


Isaac Morehouse is the founder and CEO of Praxis, a startup apprenticeship program making degrees irrelevant for careers. Isaac is dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. He’s written some books, done some podcasting, and is always experimenting with self-directed living and learning.

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